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Table of Contents
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 59-61

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy as compared to placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy for the management of myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome patients: A clinical study


1 Senior Lecturer, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Vaidik Dental College and Research Centre, Daman, India
2 Reader, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Vaidik Dental College and Research Centre, Daman, India
3 Professor, Department of Prosthodontics and Crown and Bridge, Vaidik Dental College and Research Centre, Daman, India
4 Senior Lecturer, Department of Prosthodontics and Crown and Bridge, Vaidik Dental College and Research Centre, Daman, India
5 Senior Lecturer, Department of Periodontology, Vaidik Dental College and Research Centre, Daman, India
6 Senior Lecturer, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Vaidik Dental College and Research Centre, Daman, India

Date of Submission28-Sep-2019
Date of Acceptance28-Sep-2019
Date of Web Publication25-Nov-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Abhishek vilaschandra nimavat
Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Vaidik Dental College and Research Centre, Daman
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/INPC.INPC_50_19

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  Abstract 


Aims:The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy in the management of pain in myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome patients and to determine the effectiveness of placebo TENS therapy in the management of pain in myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome patients.
Materials and Methods: Thirty patients received active TENS therapy and placebo TENS therapy. The Visual Analog Scale was used to measure the changes in pain and tenderness in the muscles of mastication.
Results:A significant improvement was observed in active TENS therapy as compared to placebo TENS therapy regarding muscle tenderness.
Conclusion:This study justifies the use of TENS therapy as well as placebo in the management of temporomandibular dysfunction. TENS therapy appears to be useful in relieving muscle pain.

Keywords: Active tens therapy, mpds, placebo tens therapy


How to cite this article:
nimavat Av, Mathur A, Shah S, Desai S, Champaneri H, Chavda S. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy as compared to placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy for the management of myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome patients: A clinical study. Int J Prev Clin Dent Res 2019;6:59-61

How to cite this URL:
nimavat Av, Mathur A, Shah S, Desai S, Champaneri H, Chavda S. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy as compared to placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy for the management of myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome patients: A clinical study. Int J Prev Clin Dent Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Dec 10];6:59-61. Available from: http://www.ijpcdr.org/text.asp?2019/6/3/59/271528




  Introduction Top


Myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPDS) is characterized by a constant dull preauricular pain which may be radiating and diffuse in nature. It is frequently associated with painful or limited mouth opening and clicking. It is difficult to know the initiating point since the condition has a multifactorial origin.[1] Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy has been used in the treatment of phantom limb pain, peripheral nerve injury, low back pain, cervical pain, joint pain, and variety of other disorders. The electrical stimulus is typically generated from portable battery-operated device and is transmitted to the patient by electrodes applied to the facial skin.[2]

Aims and objectives

The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of TENS therapy in the management of pain in myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome patients and to determine the effectiveness of placebo TENS therapy in the management of pain in myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome patients.


  Materials and Methods Top


This randomized placebo-controlled, single-blind study was carried out in patients with MPDS in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Karnavati School of Dentistry, Gandhinagar. All the participants included in the study were explained about the need and design of the study, benefits of the therapy, possible side effects, and chances of being allocated to the placebo group.[3]

Inclusion criteria were unilateral pain within one or more muscles of mastication, and exclusion criteria consist of clinical (e.g. crepitus) and/or radiographic evidence of organic changes in the temporomandibular joint (e.g. arthritis and arthrosis).[4]


  Results Top


Efficacy of both active and placebo TENS therapies in relieving tenderness (Visual Analog Scale score) in muscles of mastication was found to be statistically highly significant for active TENS therapy (P < 0.001) and significant for placebo TENS therapy (P < 0.01) at the end of the treatment[1] [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3], [Table 4].
Table 1: Comparison of masseter muscle tenderness

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Table 2: Comparison of medial pterygoid muscle tenderness

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Table 3: Comparison of temporalis muscle tenderness

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Table 4: Comparison of lateral pterygoid muscle tenderness

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  Discussion Top


Recent studies have shown that the clinician's attitude toward the patient and the treatment may contribute substantially to the total effect of the treatment.[5] Therefore, active TENS therapy uses an electric current applied to the skin to provide pain relief and its effectiveness is accomplished by activating large peripheral A-delta fibers with the TENS unit, thus closing the “gate” and preventing pain input from small C-fibers. TENS can be successful, noninvasive treatment adjuvant to conventional therapy for the treatment of MPDS patients. The results from our study are encouraging, and the use of TENS therapy has shown more favorable results in MPDS patients' management as compared to placebo TENS therapy.[6]


  Conclusion Top


The results from our study justify the use of TENS therapy in the management of MPDS. The effectiveness of active TENS therapy and placebo TENS therapy is potent in its own way but as we compare the difference between them it shows that active TENS therapy is more effective than placebo TENS therapy at the end of treatment in unilateral pain, muscles tenderness, reduced mouth opening, and clicking sound. However, the study with a large sample size having more number of patients is necessary for evaluation of effect of TENS therapy.[7]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest



 
  References Top

1.
Esposito CJ, Shay JS, Morgan B. Electronic dental anesthesia: A pilot study. Quintessence Int 1993;24:167-70.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Dworkin SF, Huggins KH, LeResche L, Von Korff M, Howard J, Truelove E, et al. Epidemiology of signs and symptoms in temporomandibular disorders: Clinical signs in cases and controls. J Am Dent Assoc 1990;120:273-81.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
McNeill C, Mohl ND, Rugh JD, Tanaka TT. Temporomandibular disorders: Diagnosis, management, education, and research. J Am Dent Assoc 1990;120:253, 255, 257.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Wessberg GA, Carroll WL, Dinham R, Wolford LM. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation as an adjunct in the management of myofascial pain-dysfunction syndrome. J Prosthet Dent 1981;45:307-14.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Møystad A, Krogstad BS, Larheim TA. Transcutaneous nerve stimulation in a group of patients with rheumatic disease involving the temporomandibular joint. J Prosthet Dent 1990;64:596-600.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Goddard G, Karibe H, McNeill C, Villafuerte E. Acupuncture and sham acupuncture reduce muscle pain in myofascial pain patients. J Orofac Pain 2002;16:71-6.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Jensen R, Rasmussen BK, Pedersen B, Lous I, Olesen J. Prevalence of oromandibular dysfunction in a general population. J Orofac Pain 1993;7:175-82.  Back to cited text no. 7
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3], [Table 4]



 

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